International Women’s Day: Interviews with the Women of EMEA

Today is International Women’s Day. This is a day to reflect and celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements made by women.

This week we spoke to some awesome women at Turbonomic and asked them a few questions as we reflect and recognize the achievements women have made this year and look ahead with the commitment we have to press for progress.

See what they had to say and why not join them? Take a look at our careers page today.

Jera Kosta, Sales Development – UK

0What was your dream job as a child?

A Singer

What do you love about working in Tech?

Dynamic environment and the hard-working culture with a lot of rewards. It definitely keeps you on your toes.

What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

Some women who have children will naturally have gaps in employments which can lead to slower career progress, but then again the women in IT that I have been lucky to work with have been fierce and ambitious and do not let barriers get in the way.

What one piece of advice would you give to your younger self on entering the tech space? Be Confident, Confidence is important to stand out and and to make yourself heard.

If you could have dinner with any woman who would it be and why?

It would be Oprah. She would have some really cool stories and would be fascinating to talk to.


Cassandra Dehlot, Sales Development – France

downloadWhat was your dream job as a child?

I wanted to become a lawyer.

What do you love about working in Tech?

The knowledge you gain from the tech company you are working for. Also, the fact that it is always innovating, never gets boring or repetitive. It is also really satisfying to see how we can progress as a woman in such a manly environment.

What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

Women themselves due to society stereotypes. We are just as good as men if not better!

What one piece of advice would you give to your younger self on entering the tech space?

Learn how to play pool! The guys in our office love playing pool.

If you could have dinner with any woman in history who would it be and why?

Angela Merkel. She has been running Germany for the last 16 years, she must have guts and I have a huge respect for that.


Rebecca Connell, EA to EMEA VP of Sales

Rebecca ConnellWhat was your dream job as a child?

To be a classical pianist / musician.

What do you love about working in Tech?

I love that every day is different. Each day has new challenges and the market is forever growing and expanding meaning you are always learning new things. It is fast paced and exciting, not to mention the huge amount of fun we all have together as a team.

What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

I think society still has a lot to learn about women and what they can offer. I believe a team thrives when there is a mixture of culture, diversity and gender.

Historically women have been viewed as the homemakers and not the breadwinner and there are still many people that believe this, both women and men.

What one piece of advice would you give to your younger self on entering the tech space?

Keep up to date with what technology is around, and the constant changes and struggles the industry faces. This goes a long way, and teamed with an inquisitive mind, there is nothing stopping you.

If you could have dinner with any woman in history who would it be and why?

Florence Nightingale. She made her name at a time where women were not recognized for their achievements. She fought to revolutionize healthcare in British society and expanded the acceptable forms of female participation in the workplace.


Jennifer Clark, Alliances Manager

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What was your dream job as a child?

I really wanted to be an archaeologist because I was obsessed with Indiana Jones.

What do you love about working in Tech?

I love how fast paced this industry is. The constant evolution of technology challenges you to learn and adapt daily. Even in my relatively limited time in the industry (4 years), the landscape of the technologies I work with has changed drastically and that is incredibly exciting to me.

What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

Culturally, I feel that women are conditioned to find self-promotion in bad taste – to wait patiently on the assumption that actions will speak for themselves and that good performance will be rewarded. While that is certainly true to an extent, elevating a career from individual contributor to leader involves selling yourself just as much as meeting KPIs and exceeding targets. Owning your success and confidently speaking about your accomplishments is absolutely critical in order to be perceived as an expert in your field and therefore a leader that other people will look to for advice and guidance.

What one piece of advice would you give to your younger self on entering the tech space?

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. As a woman, new to such a male-dominated industry, I felt the need to prove myself – my competency, my independence and that pressure deterred me from asking questions. The ability to recognize gaps in your understanding and seeking out the answers is a show of strength and the only way to improve and grow.

If you could have dinner with any woman in history who would it be and why?

Reese Witherspoon. She’s had such a significant influence on evolving the way women are portrayed in film and this directly correlates to the movements that are changing the conversation about feminism and equality.

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